Holly Bailey

Just What the Internet Needed: Another Blog
Random thoughts on photography, pop culture and politics. Who am I? This is my day job. But you might remember me from here. You can also follow me on Twitter, see a list of my stories via Google Plus and view all the posts I've liked on Tumblr. I am also the proprietor of this blog.
  • April 14, 2014 11:44 am

    gettyimages:

    Testament - Chris Hondros

    Testament is a collection of photographs and writing by late photojournalist Chris Hondros spanning over a decade of coverage from most of the world’s conflicts since the late 1990s, including Kosovo, Afghanistan, the West Bank, Iraq, Liberia, Egypt, and Libya.

    Hondros was not just a front-line war photographer, but also a committed observer and witness, and his work humanizes complex world events and brings to light shared human experiences. Evident in his writings, interspersed throughout, Hondros was determined to broaden our understanding of war and its consequences.

    This video introduces a selection of powerful images taken from Testament accompanied by audio of an interview with Chris, first broadcast on NPR on March 26, 2007, as part of the interview ‘A War Photographer’s View of Iraq’.

    Music in the video is Concerto grosso in F minor, Opus 1, no. 8 by Pietro Locatelli (1695-1764) performed by American Virtuosi Baroque Orchestra under the musical direction of Kenneth Hamrick. Kenneth and Chris worked together on a series entitled ‘Sound and Vision’ which encompassed live music performance alongside projections of Chris’ images. A special thanks to both NPR and Kenneth Hamrick for their contribution to this piece.

    Testament is now available for purchase, with all Getty Images’ proceeds from the sale of the book being donated to The Chris Hondros Fund.
    Inspired by his life, work and vision, The Fund endeavors to bring light to shared human experiences by supporting and protecting photojournalists. For more information please visit www.chrishondrosfund.org.

  • April 8, 2014 11:19 am
    
It was one of the most searing images of the war in Iraq: a tiny girl, splattered in blood and screaming in horror after her parents had been shot and killed by American soldiers who fired on the family car when it failed to yield for a foot patrol in the northern town of Tel Afar.

Taken by Getty Images photographer Chris Hondros, who was embedded with the patrol, the January 2005 photo offered powerful visual testimony to the horrific impact of the conflict on Iraqi citizens. It came as the American public was beginning to question the rising death toll and purpose of a war that was starting to look unwinnable.

Hondros was inured to the chaos of war. By then, he was a veteran combat photographer who had served as a witness for the world on the frontlines of conflicts in far-away places like Afghanistan, Pakistan, Liberia and Sierra Leone. But Hondros wasn’t merely fueled by the adrenaline of covering war. He was there to document the impact of conflict on people, both soldiers and civilians, to discover something deeper about humanity through war.
“He tried to make sense of what was happening around him, to really understand the chaos that he often found himself in,” recalled Sandy Ciric, a longtime photo editor at Getty Images who was one of Hondros’s closest friends and colleagues. “He was a professional, and he knew it was his job to document. But he was also human. He was really affected by the people he met and the things he saw… He was always thinking and writing and shooting and working, trying to understand the terrible complexity of war and the impact it had on people.”

So it was a horrible and painful twist of fate that a photographer so determined to show the world the human impact of conflict died trying to do just that. Hondros was killed in a mortar attack along with fellow photojournalist Tim Hetherington in April 2011 while covering the war in Libya.

He left behind an adoring mother, a fiance and a tight-knit group of friends and colleagues who were devastated by his death but also determined to preserve his memory and legacy as one of the most promising photojournalists of a generation who died too soon.

It’s that career that is the subject of  “Testament,”  a new book of Hondros’s work published by Powerhouse Books and Getty Images (which is donating its portion of the proceeds to The Chris Hondros Fund). The book, edited by Ciric and Pancho Bernasconi of Getty Images and Christina Piaia, Hondros’s fiance, features not only images that Hondros took over more than a decade of covering conflict, but also his own words, taken from stories and essays he wrote about his experiences on the road as he sought to understand what he was seeing through his lens.

I previewed the new Chris Hondros Book, which is out today (via Yahoo News) View high resolution

    It was one of the most searing images of the war in Iraq: a tiny girl, splattered in blood and screaming in horror after her parents had been shot and killed by American soldiers who fired on the family car when it failed to yield for a foot patrol in the northern town of Tel Afar.

    Taken by Getty Images photographer Chris Hondros, who was embedded with the patrol, the January 2005 photo offered powerful visual testimony to the horrific impact of the conflict on Iraqi citizens. It came as the American public was beginning to question the rising death toll and purpose of a war that was starting to look unwinnable.

    Hondros was inured to the chaos of war. By then, he was a veteran combat photographer who had served as a witness for the world on the frontlines of conflicts in far-away places like Afghanistan, Pakistan, Liberia and Sierra Leone. But Hondros wasn’t merely fueled by the adrenaline of covering war. He was there to document the impact of conflict on people, both soldiers and civilians, to discover something deeper about humanity through war.

    “He tried to make sense of what was happening around him, to really understand the chaos that he often found himself in,” recalled Sandy Ciric, a longtime photo editor at Getty Images who was one of Hondros’s closest friends and colleagues. “He was a professional, and he knew it was his job to document. But he was also human. He was really affected by the people he met and the things he saw… He was always thinking and writing and shooting and working, trying to understand the terrible complexity of war and the impact it had on people.”

    So it was a horrible and painful twist of fate that a photographer so determined to show the world the human impact of conflict died trying to do just that. Hondros was killed in a mortar attack along with fellow photojournalist Tim Hetherington in April 2011 while covering the war in Libya.

    He left behind an adoring mother, a fiance and a tight-knit group of friends and colleagues who were devastated by his death but also determined to preserve his memory and legacy as one of the most promising photojournalists of a generation who died too soon.

    It’s that career that is the subject of “Testament,” a new book of Hondros’s work published by Powerhouse Books and Getty Images (which is donating its portion of the proceeds to The Chris Hondros Fund). The book, edited by Ciric and Pancho Bernasconi of Getty Images and Christina Piaia, Hondros’s fiance, features not only images that Hondros took over more than a decade of covering conflict, but also his own words, taken from stories and essays he wrote about his experiences on the road as he sought to understand what he was seeing through his lens.

    I previewed the new Chris Hondros Book, which is out today (via Yahoo News)

  • January 16, 2014 1:33 pm
    reportagebygettyimages:

PowerHouse Books will be publishing “Testament,” a collection of photographs and writing by the late photojournalist Chris Hondros, in April of this year. Hondros, an employee of Getty Images, was killed while working in Misurata, Libya, in April 2011. The book covers his work from most of the world’s conflicts since the late 1990s, including Kosovo, Afghanistan, the West Bank, Iraq, Liberia, Egypt and Libya.
From the PowerHouse press release:

Hondros was not just a front-line war photographer, but also a committed observer and witness, and his work humanizes complex world events and brings to light shared human experiences. Evident in his writings, interspersed throughout, Hondros was determined to broaden our understanding of war and its consequences.

Read more on PowerHouse’s Web site.
View high resolution

    reportagebygettyimages:

    PowerHouse Books will be publishing “Testament,” a collection of photographs and writing by the late photojournalist Chris Hondros, in April of this year. Hondros, an employee of Getty Images, was killed while working in Misurata, Libya, in April 2011. The book covers his work from most of the world’s conflicts since the late 1990s, including Kosovo, Afghanistan, the West Bank, Iraq, Liberia, Egypt and Libya.

    From the PowerHouse press release:

    Hondros was not just a front-line war photographer, but also a committed observer and witness, and his work humanizes complex world events and brings to light shared human experiences. Evident in his writings, interspersed throughout, Hondros was determined to broaden our understanding of war and its consequences.

    Read more on PowerHouse’s Web site.

  • August 5, 2013 10:42 pm
    Chris Hondros was a Getty Images photographer who was killed in April 2011 while covering the war in Libya. Last month, I wrote about a Kickstarter his friend Greg Campbell had launched to raise funds for a film that would explore Chris’s life by telling the stories behind some of his most famous photos, including the one above which has an amazing back story. The campaign is set to wrap up on Aug. 8, and Campbell is hoping to raise $100,000 to fund most of the film. You can read my story about the project here or donate here. View high resolution

    Chris Hondros was a Getty Images photographer who was killed in April 2011 while covering the war in Libya. Last month, I wrote about a Kickstarter his friend Greg Campbell had launched to raise funds for a film that would explore Chris’s life by telling the stories behind some of his most famous photos, including the one above which has an amazing back story. The campaign is set to wrap up on Aug. 8, and Campbell is hoping to raise $100,000 to fund most of the film. You can read my story about the project here or donate here.

  • July 12, 2013 9:48 am

    Chris Hondros was a Getty Images photographer who was killed in April 2011 while covering the war in Libya. His friend Greg Campbell launched a Kickstarter this week to raise funds for a film that would explore Chris’s life by telling the stories behind some of his most famous photos.

    That includes the above shot of Joseph Duo, a Liberian soldier Hondros photographed during the country’s deadly civil war in July 2003. The two didn’t formally meet until two years later, and afterwards, Hondros paid for Duo to finish high school in hopes he would find a better life.

    I wrote about that unlikely friendship and Campbell’s upcoming film for Yahoo News, a story that also includes a pretty great slideshow of Hondros’ photography.

  • April 18, 2013 10:03 pm

    "Indeed, that has been one of the most troubling parts of the deaths of Tim and Chris Hondros. Chris has somehow dropped from public view. He was a consummate professional and classical photojournalist; quietly, consistently and diligently covering all the major conflicts since the late 90′s in an even-handed style. Amidst his steady approach are two icons of war photography from Liberia and Iraq. He was also popular and highly respected by his peers. Yet his name is often mentioned as an afterthought, if at all. Paradoxically, it was this kind of elevation of the individual to the exclusion of the bigger ideas that Tim was trying to reject with his work."

    — Peter van Agtmael in a piece for Lightbox about Chris Hondros, Tim Hetherington and Sebastian Junger’s HBO documentary

    (Source: http)

  • April 15, 2013 10:25 am
    
Junger’s film also seems to question whether Hetherington took his desire to be on the front line too far. According to the documentary, Hetherington, who was 40 when he died, was conflicted about his desire to settle down with his girlfriend, Idil Ibrahim, and his quest to tell the story of war. In the documentary he even acknowledges that war photography can be a “very destructive thing to carry on beyond a certain age.”

The film ends with footage Hetherington shot in Misrata before he and Hondros were killed, including a visit inside a building were rebel soldiers were trying to smoke out enemy snipers by sending burning tires into rooms where they were barricaded.

The area felt unsafe to some journalists who had been with Hetherington and his group earlier that day, including photographer Andre Liohn, who questions in the film whether the group had put themselves in unnecessary danger.

“In the war you lose a lot of things (and) one of the things that you lose can be the original connection that took you there,” Liohn says. “I felt they were not paying the proper attention and the proper respect to everything that was happening around. They were trying to get in front of the rebels.”

Junger said he included Liohn’s comments because he still struggles with the question of whether Hetherington took too much of a risk that day.
“The decision to go out to the front line is inherently risky. It’s inherently understandable because front lines are compelling. And it’s inherently stupid. It’s all of them at the same time,” Junger said. “Everyone makes that decision, and most of the time it goes fine. And when it doesn’t go fine everyone goes, ‘What the hell were you thinking?’”
Junger added, “That said, I do wonder why after the intensity of fighting that Tim was part of in the morning, why he felt compelled to go out for a second dose, a second helping? That I don’t quite get. But had I been there, I think I would have been perfectly capable of doing the same thing. So I don’t want to be too judgmental about it. But I do wonder.”

I talked to Sebastian Junger about his Tim Hetherington documentary (via Yahoo News) View high resolution

    Junger’s film also seems to question whether Hetherington took his desire to be on the front line too far. According to the documentary, Hetherington, who was 40 when he died, was conflicted about his desire to settle down with his girlfriend, Idil Ibrahim, and his quest to tell the story of war. In the documentary he even acknowledges that war photography can be a “very destructive thing to carry on beyond a certain age.”

    The film ends with footage Hetherington shot in Misrata before he and Hondros were killed, including a visit inside a building were rebel soldiers were trying to smoke out enemy snipers by sending burning tires into rooms where they were barricaded.

    The area felt unsafe to some journalists who had been with Hetherington and his group earlier that day, including photographer Andre Liohn, who questions in the film whether the group had put themselves in unnecessary danger.

    “In the war you lose a lot of things (and) one of the things that you lose can be the original connection that took you there,” Liohn says. “I felt they were not paying the proper attention and the proper respect to everything that was happening around. They were trying to get in front of the rebels.”

    Junger said he included Liohn’s comments because he still struggles with the question of whether Hetherington took too much of a risk that day.

    “The decision to go out to the front line is inherently risky. It’s inherently understandable because front lines are compelling. And it’s inherently stupid. It’s all of them at the same time,” Junger said. “Everyone makes that decision, and most of the time it goes fine. And when it doesn’t go fine everyone goes, ‘What the hell were you thinking?’”

    Junger added, “That said, I do wonder why after the intensity of fighting that Tim was part of in the morning, why he felt compelled to go out for a second dose, a second helping? That I don’t quite get. But had I been there, I think I would have been perfectly capable of doing the same thing. So I don’t want to be too judgmental about it. But I do wonder.”

    I talked to Sebastian Junger about his Tim Hetherington documentary (via Yahoo News)

  • March 19, 2013 7:56 pm
    NY Mag’s Approval Matrix dings the Brooklyn Bridge Park for canceling its “name the lawn” contest after Chris Hondros, a Getty Images photographer who was killed in Libya, became the lead write-in candidate. View high resolution

    NY Mag’s Approval Matrix dings the Brooklyn Bridge Park for canceling its “name the lawn” contest after Chris Hondros, a Getty Images photographer who was killed in Libya, became the lead write-in candidate.