Holly Bailey

Posts tagged chris hondros

reportagebygettyimages:

On July 16th, Brooklyn Brewery co-founder and former AP reporter Steve Hindy will discuss the work of late photojournalist Chris Hondros with the editors of “Testament,” a collection of photographs and writing by Hondros. As a Getty Images staff photographer, Hondros covered most of the world’s major conflicts from the late 1990s until he was killed while working in Libya in 2011. See more info and purchase tickets for this event here.

reportagebygettyimages:

On July 16th, Brooklyn Brewery co-founder and former AP reporter Steve Hindy will discuss the work of late photojournalist Chris Hondros with the editors of “Testament,” a collection of photographs and writing by Hondros. As a Getty Images staff photographer, Hondros covered most of the world’s major conflicts from the late 1990s until he was killed while working in Libya in 2011. See more info and purchase tickets for this event here.


gettyimages:

Testament - Chris Hondros

Testament is a collection of photographs and writing by late photojournalist Chris Hondros spanning over a decade of coverage from most of the world’s conflicts since the late 1990s, including Kosovo, Afghanistan, the West Bank, Iraq, Liberia, Egypt, and Libya.

Hondros was not just a front-line war photographer, but also a committed observer and witness, and his work humanizes complex world events and brings to light shared human experiences. Evident in his writings, interspersed throughout, Hondros was determined to broaden our understanding of war and its consequences.

This video introduces a selection of powerful images taken from Testament accompanied by audio of an interview with Chris, first broadcast on NPR on March 26, 2007, as part of the interview ‘A War Photographer’s View of Iraq’.

Music in the video is Concerto grosso in F minor, Opus 1, no. 8 by Pietro Locatelli (1695-1764) performed by American Virtuosi Baroque Orchestra under the musical direction of Kenneth Hamrick. Kenneth and Chris worked together on a series entitled ‘Sound and Vision’ which encompassed live music performance alongside projections of Chris’ images. A special thanks to both NPR and Kenneth Hamrick for their contribution to this piece.

Testament is now available for purchase, with all Getty Images’ proceeds from the sale of the book being donated to The Chris Hondros Fund.
Inspired by his life, work and vision, The Fund endeavors to bring light to shared human experiences by supporting and protecting photojournalists. For more information please visit www.chrishondrosfund.org.



It was one of the most searing images of the war in Iraq: a tiny girl, splattered in blood and screaming in horror after her parents had been shot and killed by American soldiers who fired on the family car when it failed to yield for a foot patrol in the northern town of Tel Afar.

Taken by Getty Images photographer Chris Hondros, who was embedded with the patrol, the January 2005 photo offered powerful visual testimony to the horrific impact of the conflict on Iraqi citizens. It came as the American public was beginning to question the rising death toll and purpose of a war that was starting to look unwinnable.

Hondros was inured to the chaos of war. By then, he was a veteran combat photographer who had served as a witness for the world on the frontlines of conflicts in far-away places like Afghanistan, Pakistan, Liberia and Sierra Leone. But Hondros wasn’t merely fueled by the adrenaline of covering war. He was there to document the impact of conflict on people, both soldiers and civilians, to discover something deeper about humanity through war.
“He tried to make sense of what was happening around him, to really understand the chaos that he often found himself in,” recalled Sandy Ciric, a longtime photo editor at Getty Images who was one of Hondros’s closest friends and colleagues. “He was a professional, and he knew it was his job to document. But he was also human. He was really affected by the people he met and the things he saw… He was always thinking and writing and shooting and working, trying to understand the terrible complexity of war and the impact it had on people.”

So it was a horrible and painful twist of fate that a photographer so determined to show the world the human impact of conflict died trying to do just that. Hondros was killed in a mortar attack along with fellow photojournalist Tim Hetherington in April 2011 while covering the war in Libya.

He left behind an adoring mother, a fiance and a tight-knit group of friends and colleagues who were devastated by his death but also determined to preserve his memory and legacy as one of the most promising photojournalists of a generation who died too soon.

It’s that career that is the subject of  “Testament,”  a new book of Hondros’s work published by Powerhouse Books and Getty Images (which is donating its portion of the proceeds to The Chris Hondros Fund). The book, edited by Ciric and Pancho Bernasconi of Getty Images and Christina Piaia, Hondros’s fiance, features not only images that Hondros took over more than a decade of covering conflict, but also his own words, taken from stories and essays he wrote about his experiences on the road as he sought to understand what he was seeing through his lens.

I previewed the new Chris Hondros Book, which is out today (via Yahoo News)

It was one of the most searing images of the war in Iraq: a tiny girl, splattered in blood and screaming in horror after her parents had been shot and killed by American soldiers who fired on the family car when it failed to yield for a foot patrol in the northern town of Tel Afar.

Taken by Getty Images photographer Chris Hondros, who was embedded with the patrol, the January 2005 photo offered powerful visual testimony to the horrific impact of the conflict on Iraqi citizens. It came as the American public was beginning to question the rising death toll and purpose of a war that was starting to look unwinnable.

Hondros was inured to the chaos of war. By then, he was a veteran combat photographer who had served as a witness for the world on the frontlines of conflicts in far-away places like Afghanistan, Pakistan, Liberia and Sierra Leone. But Hondros wasn’t merely fueled by the adrenaline of covering war. He was there to document the impact of conflict on people, both soldiers and civilians, to discover something deeper about humanity through war.

“He tried to make sense of what was happening around him, to really understand the chaos that he often found himself in,” recalled Sandy Ciric, a longtime photo editor at Getty Images who was one of Hondros’s closest friends and colleagues. “He was a professional, and he knew it was his job to document. But he was also human. He was really affected by the people he met and the things he saw… He was always thinking and writing and shooting and working, trying to understand the terrible complexity of war and the impact it had on people.”

So it was a horrible and painful twist of fate that a photographer so determined to show the world the human impact of conflict died trying to do just that. Hondros was killed in a mortar attack along with fellow photojournalist Tim Hetherington in April 2011 while covering the war in Libya.

He left behind an adoring mother, a fiance and a tight-knit group of friends and colleagues who were devastated by his death but also determined to preserve his memory and legacy as one of the most promising photojournalists of a generation who died too soon.

It’s that career that is the subject of “Testament,” a new book of Hondros’s work published by Powerhouse Books and Getty Images (which is donating its portion of the proceeds to The Chris Hondros Fund). The book, edited by Ciric and Pancho Bernasconi of Getty Images and Christina Piaia, Hondros’s fiance, features not only images that Hondros took over more than a decade of covering conflict, but also his own words, taken from stories and essays he wrote about his experiences on the road as he sought to understand what he was seeing through his lens.

I previewed the new Chris Hondros Book, which is out today (via Yahoo News)


reportagebygettyimages:

PowerHouse Books will be publishing “Testament,” a collection of photographs and writing by the late photojournalist Chris Hondros, in April of this year. Hondros, an employee of Getty Images, was killed while working in Misurata, Libya, in April 2011. The book covers his work from most of the world’s conflicts since the late 1990s, including Kosovo, Afghanistan, the West Bank, Iraq, Liberia, Egypt and Libya.
From the PowerHouse press release:

Hondros was not just a front-line war photographer, but also a committed observer and witness, and his work humanizes complex world events and brings to light shared human experiences. Evident in his writings, interspersed throughout, Hondros was determined to broaden our understanding of war and its consequences.

Read more on PowerHouse’s Web site.

reportagebygettyimages:

PowerHouse Books will be publishing “Testament,” a collection of photographs and writing by the late photojournalist Chris Hondros, in April of this year. Hondros, an employee of Getty Images, was killed while working in Misurata, Libya, in April 2011. The book covers his work from most of the world’s conflicts since the late 1990s, including Kosovo, Afghanistan, the West Bank, Iraq, Liberia, Egypt and Libya.

From the PowerHouse press release:

Hondros was not just a front-line war photographer, but also a committed observer and witness, and his work humanizes complex world events and brings to light shared human experiences. Evident in his writings, interspersed throughout, Hondros was determined to broaden our understanding of war and its consequences.

Read more on PowerHouse’s Web site.


Chris Hondros was a Getty Images photographer who was killed in April 2011 while covering the war in Libya. Last month, I wrote about a Kickstarter his friend Greg Campbell had launched to raise funds for a film that would explore Chris’s life by telling the stories behind some of his most famous photos, including the one above which has an amazing back story. The campaign is set to wrap up on Aug. 8, and Campbell is hoping to raise $100,000 to fund most of the film. You can read my story about the project here or donate here.

Chris Hondros was a Getty Images photographer who was killed in April 2011 while covering the war in Libya. Last month, I wrote about a Kickstarter his friend Greg Campbell had launched to raise funds for a film that would explore Chris’s life by telling the stories behind some of his most famous photos, including the one above which has an amazing back story. The campaign is set to wrap up on Aug. 8, and Campbell is hoping to raise $100,000 to fund most of the film. You can read my story about the project here or donate here.



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