Holly Bailey

Just What the Internet Needed: Another Blog
Random thoughts on photography, pop culture and politics. Who am I? This is my day job. But you might remember me from here. You can also follow me on Twitter, see a list of my stories via Google Plus and view all the posts I've liked on Tumblr. I am also the proprietor of this blog.
  • April 21, 2013 11:19 pm
    
Carlos is a highly charged guy who’s always trying to do the good thing. After the death of his first son, he and his wife Melida both made a commitment to the peace movement. For years now they’ve been attending funerals of fallen soldiers and other public events and protests, work and aspiring for peace. I think it’s interrupted his ability to work. Full of passion and emotion, Melida is often the person who holds him together. In some respects, he seems to be unstoppable.
I’ve been with him as he pulls around a wagon with a photograph of Alex in a casket — an action that elicits a huge public response. Just blocks from the Boston Common, people spat on him, cursed him and taunted him for carrying a picture of a dead person in a coffin. This is something very revealing and terrible about the concept of what photographs can do. If you have the right image of carnage, you’re a hero. If you have the wrong image of the aftermath, you’re a villain.

Eugene Richards shares photos he took of Carlos Arredondo, the “cowboy hero” of the Boston Marathon, back in 2006 when he was grieving the loss of his first son who died in Iraq (via Lightbox) View high resolution

    Carlos is a highly charged guy who’s always trying to do the good thing. After the death of his first son, he and his wife Melida both made a commitment to the peace movement. For years now they’ve been attending funerals of fallen soldiers and other public events and protests, work and aspiring for peace. I think it’s interrupted his ability to work. Full of passion and emotion, Melida is often the person who holds him together. In some respects, he seems to be unstoppable.

    I’ve been with him as he pulls around a wagon with a photograph of Alex in a casket — an action that elicits a huge public response. Just blocks from the Boston Common, people spat on him, cursed him and taunted him for carrying a picture of a dead person in a coffin. This is something very revealing and terrible about the concept of what photographs can do. If you have the right image of carnage, you’re a hero. If you have the wrong image of the aftermath, you’re a villain.

    Eugene Richards shares photos he took of Carlos Arredondo, the “cowboy hero” of the Boston Marathon, back in 2006 when he was grieving the loss of his first son who died in Iraq (via Lightbox)

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